Monthly Archives: April 2013

Review: About Elly (2009)

“A bitter ending is better than an endless bitterness.” Asghar Farhadi’s A Separation (2011) was a film that managed to gain a lot of supporters because it touched upon numerous themes that are universal and not just confined to contemporary … Continue reading

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Review: King of Devil’s Island (2011)

Marius Holst’s film is initially impressive because it is based on true events that occurred at Bastøy Prison in Norway yet feels wholly cinematic and not at all like a docudrama. He attempts to build up tension by testing the … Continue reading

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Review: The Sessions (2012)

The Sessions, based on a true story and detailing a paralysed poet’s attempts to lose his virginity through the use of a sex surrogate, is clearly attempting to deal with both disability and love/sexuality in a different and more subtle … Continue reading

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Review: Your Sister’s Sister (2012)

Lynn Shelton’s Humpday (2009) is the kind of film that takes its’ high concept – two straight men decide to film themselves having sex – and develops it into something much more emotionally mature than any synopsis suggested. It also … Continue reading

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Review: Japón (2002)

Carlos Reygadas’ debut film follows a nameless man who leaves Mexico City to travel to a more rural setting. He makes no secret of the fact that his is a one way journey, that he intends to kill himself. He … Continue reading

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Review: Oslo, August 31st (2011)

While I did enjoy the Millennium trilogy, and thought Headhunters was one of 2012’s superior thrillers, the impression they give is that the only thing Scandinavia is supplying cinematically at the moment is bleak, brutish noir. Joachim Trier has other … Continue reading

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Review: Liberal Arts (2012)

Josh Radnor, who also wrote and directed this feature about a 35-year-old college admissions officer (Jesse) who returns to his alma mater to attend a retirement ceremony for a beloved professor, is best known for his role as Ted on … Continue reading

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